Pesticide News

for 2017

Revised Label Language for Pesticide Products in Water Soluble Packaging to Protect Handlers

The Environmental Protection Agency has sent a letter to registrants of products with water soluble packaging (WSP) with revised instructions to be placed on the label of those products. When used properly, WSP can significantly reduce handler exposure during the mixing and loading of pesticides, de-handlers#exceptions" style="color: rgb(56, 100, 163);" target="_blank">qualifying it as a closed mixing/loading system under the Agricultural Worker Protection Standard. However, some unintended practices in the field are actually increasing the risks, negating the intention of the technology.
 
EPA worked with state officials and a task force of pesticide registrants to examine the issue and develop the improved language in order to eliminate misuse and protect handlers. 
 
The Agricultural Handler Exposure Task Force (a group formed by multiple registrants of agricultural products to generate exposure data in support of registration) uncovered this problem while conducting exposure studies for water soluble packaging. They observed improper use of products in water soluble packaging, such as spraying the products with high pressure water and intentional breaking of water soluble bags. The task force notified EPA of their observations and offered draft label language to address the improper use of the products.
 
The new label language includes detailed, step-by-step instructions specifically designed to correct misuse and protect handlers from exposure.

___________________________________________________________________________

National Poison Prevention Week – EPA Urges Public to Keep All Pesticides in Original Containers to Prevent Accidental Poisoning

National Poison Prevention Week is  March 19-25 .  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is highlighting the dangers of removing pesticides and other household chemicals from their original containers and storing them in bottles or cans that can be mistaken for drink. Poison Control Centers have reported cases of accidental poisonings from ingestion of chemical substances stored in soda and juice bottles and cans, coffee cups, baby bottles and various other beverage containers.

One of the simplest ways to prevent poisonings is to always keep products in their original containers. Product labels contain valuable use instructions and important precautions and first aid needed in case of an emergency.

National Poison Prevention Week is a time to raise awareness about simple steps that can be taken to prevent poisonings. Most poisonings happen in people’s homes and are preventable. Here are tips to reduce exposure:

  • Post the Poison Control Centers’ national helpline number, 1-800-222-1222, near your phone. Program the number into your phone's "address book." 
  • Read the product label first and follow the directions to the letter.
  • Never transfer pesticides and other household chemical products to containers that may be mistaken for food or drink. 
  • Re-close products if interrupted during application (e.g., phone call, doorbell, etc.).
  • Use child-resistant packaging properly by closing the container tightly after use.
  • Make sure all of your household cleaning and pesticide products are stored out of children’s reach and use childproof locks on low cabinets.
  • Remove children, pets, and toys before applying pesticides (inside or outside the home). Follow label directions to determine when children and pets can re-enter the area that has been treated.

More information about poisoning prevention in your home: 

https://www.epa.gov/safepestcontrol/got-pests-control-them-safely

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Center for Integrated Pest Management has launched the Pesticide Environmental Stewardship website. This site is designed for anyone who applies, sells, stores or disposes of pesticides. The website complements the work of Extension agents and Pesticide Safety Education Programs. It covers a wide variety of stewardship topics ranging from storage, handling and disposal, drift runoff and has an extensive section for Homeowners.

Back to Top