Gaalee'ya Stem Project

The Gaalee’ya STEM project provides a rigorous and culturally relevant STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) program through the Associate’s level for students in the Interior-Aleutians (IAC) and Chukchi Campus (CC) regions by incorporating cultural values and perspectives and local interests in ecosystem changes with scientific coursework, research, and analysis from a Western academic perspective.

The underlying philosophy behind the project is that integrating culture and place into all aspects of their academic STEM experience will support the engagement, capacity, and continuity of rural Alaska Native STEM students.

In addition to STEM coursework, Students will gain research experience through projects designed around the theme of “ecology of place” to engage, educate, and retain rural Alaska Native students in STEM degrees. Elders and STEM faculty will work together to support the students using an integrative approach. 

Application for the The Gaalee’ya STEM project

Elder Howard Luke, founder of the Gaalee’ya Spirit Camp

Elder Howard Luke, founder of the Gaalee’ya Spirit Camp

“Gaalee’ya, it’s a luck that you get by learning to live right with the land and the animals, including people, and everything around you, you respect everything.  It gives you the power to know the things that help you survive in a good way.  You gotta protect this luck by respect.  All these things are going to come back again, so you gotta listen and learn from the Elders.”


Misti Hopkins, Program Coordinator

mlhopkins2@alaska.edu

Interior-Aleutians Campus
PO Box 756720
Fairbanks, AK 99775
866-832-2010 · 907-474-2616

Mary Booth-Barger, Student Services

mboothbarger@alaska.edu  
Chukchi Campus
PO Box 297
Kotzebue, AK 99752
800-478-3402

National Science Foundation

This Project is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant no. HRD-0803161


Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expresses in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the National Science Foundation

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