Museum

In the Media

Museum researchers and experts are consulted by a variety of media and science communication professionals around the globe. For a more detailed list of stories and consultations, visit our media archive page.

HOW GIANT MARINE REPTILES TERRORIZED THE ANCIENT SEAS

Discover how ichthyosaurs, were once the largest and most mysterious predators to prowl the oceans. Now they are giving up their secrets. "On Norway’s Spitsbergen Island north of the Arctic Circle, researchers have hacked away the permafrost to reveal large, primitive ichthyosaurs that seem to date to the very early Triassic. The finds have yet to be identified, but they help to show that 'once these things hit the water, they just went nuts,' says Patrick Druckenmiller," the museum's earth sciences curator.
(Nature; March 29, 2017)

FROM THE ASHES: LIFE RETURNS TO KASATOCHI VOLCANO

Discover the living laboratory left in the wake of an unexpected eruption of Kasatochi, a volcanic island in the Aleutians. Curator Derek Sikes has returned almost every year since the explosion left the island covered in mud and ash. The results have not been what scientists expected.
(Alaska's Energy Desk, KTOO Juneau; February 13, 2017)

FIRST DINOSAUR FOSSILS DISCOVERED IN DENALI NATIONAL PARK

After years of planning, museum researchers joined Denali paleontologists on an exploratory trip into the national park during the summer of 2016. They found the first dinosaur bones and several sites worth exploring further. Read more about what this means for science.
(Smithsonian Magazine; October 20, 2016)

3,000 POUNDS OF WHALE BONES AIRLIFTED FOR UNIQUE SALVAGE PROJECT

Watch thrilling video of an effort by museum scientists and volunteers to salvage an entire humpback whale skeleton from an Anchorage beach during the summer of 2016. The museum's mammal department is overseeing the preparation of the specimen for the museum's collection by first burying the bones so the flesh can be eaten by beetles. The goal is to reconstruct the skeleton as part of the museum's exhibits. 
(KTUU-TV Anchorage; October 12, 2016)

Mastodons disappeared from ancient Berengia before humans arrived

Find out how new radiocarbon dating of mastodon fossils, most of them from the museum's collections, suggest an early extinction in Beringia. Several UAF scientists, including curator Pat Druckenmiller, were co-authors of the research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Popular Archaeology; December 1, 2014)

Researchers identify ancient Alaska marine reptile

Scientists led by Curator Pat Druckenmiller have identified the first ichthyosaur discovered in Alaska. Read a story about the journey of the fossil from the North Slope to the museum and now (Alaska Dispatch News; November 24, 2014)

Specimen collection: An essential tool

Read the response by the museum's curator of birds and more than 120 of his colleagues to a criticism of scientific collecting in the journal Science. (Science Magazine; May 23, 2014)

Fairbanks scientists discover trove of dinosaur fossils along the Yukon River

Explore the discovery of a major new source of dinosaur fossils along the Yukon River by Curator of Earth Sciences Pat Druckenmiller and Operations Manager Kevin May. (Alaska Dispatch; Sept. 22, 2013)

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