Stalking


What is stalking?

Stalking has different definitions; however, according to the National Center for Victims of Crime 2012, Stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.

Stalking can be a pattern of behavior which makes an individual feel afraid, nervous, harassed or can place someone in danger.  The behavior can negatively impact a person’s educational or work environment, which affects their life.

Stalking can come in the form of:

  • Repeated mail, e-mail, pictures, unwanted calling or repeated texting
  • Sending you repeated unwanted gifts, receiving unwanted letters
  • Utilizing social media as a way of communicating you.
  • Stealing your thing or damaging your property

Stalking can be performed by anyone, from someone you know to a complete stranger.  Stalking is an activity which must not be tolerated and should be reported. 

For more information on Stalking please visit http://victimsofcrime.org/our-programs/stalking-resource-center.


 

University of Alaska policy regarding stalking

UA Board of Regents policy 09.02.20 defines stalking as "repetitive and/or menacing pursuit, following, or interference with the peace and/or safety of an individual(s)."

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  1. sexual exploitation, defined as occurring when a person takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited (and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other gender-based or sexual misconduct offenses), including but not limited to:
    1. sexually-based stalking and/or bullying.
  2. other misconduct offenses, such as threats, intimidation, bullying, cyber-bullying, stalking, discrimination, or relationship violence, when the offenses are sex- or gender-based. 
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