Alexandra Reich

Alexandra Reich

M.S. Student

Fisheries


17101 Lena Point Loop Road
Juneau, AK 99801
agreich@alaska.edu

 

Education

University of California, San Diego
B.S. Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution
2016

 

Thesis

Relaxed Selection in Salmon Hatcheries

 

 

 

 

Biography

Alex received a B.S. in Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution from the University of California, San Diego in 2016, with a focus of study in marine plant ecology. After hitchhiking through Patagonia, Alex moved to the Colorado Rocky Mountains, where she worked seasonally for the U.S. Forest Service and local ski resorts. Alex eventually moved back to California to work with wild and hatchery Chinook salmon on the upper Sacramento River for Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission. Just starting out in her journey as a graduate student, and new to Alaska, Alex is excited to learn more about the complexities behind wild/hatchery salmon interaction and contribute toward understanding this multifaceted issue. During her free time, Alex enjoys skiing, mountain biking, backpacking, and hanging out with her cat, Freddy.

 

Career Goals

Alex is interested in continuing to research wild-hatchery salmon interaction in Alaska. She would also consider incorporating geospatial data and genomic analysis.

Specialties

  • Salmonid research
  • Wild-hatchery interaction

 

Current research projects

Alex is studying relaxed selection in salmon due to hatchery breeding. Reduced fitness in salmon hatcheries is a major concern for fisheries management, as hatchery salmon can stray and interbreed with wild stocks. By collecting wild samples of pink and coho salmon from broodstock locations and comparing them to samples of the equivalent hatchery fish, Alex will analyze how years of hatchery rearing is impacting salmon secondary sex characteristics.

 

Certifications

  • Wilderness First Responder – NOLS
  • Scuba Open Water – PADI
  • Swiftwater Rescue – Sierra Rescue International
  • Certified Interpretive Guide – NAI
  • California Boater Card