PhD in Indigenous Studies

Why choose Indigenous Studies? A graduate program in cross-cultural/Indigenous Studies may be for you if you are interested in issues associated with Indigenous Knowledge Systems, cultural interchange and cross-cultural education. Students wll participate in research and development activities across a variety of academic disciplines and applied fields at UAF.

Candidates are encouraged to engage in comparative studies with other Indigenous peoples around the world and to focus their dissertation research on issues of relevance to Alaska and the Arctic.

CXCS offers one doctorate degree program:

Contact us

Sean Asiqłuq Topkok, CXCS Chair

Office: 306 Brooks Building

Phone: 907-474-5537

Email: cstopkok@alaska.edu

*Contact Dr. Topkok for questions or concerns about the Indigenous Studies program.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Indigenous Studies Ph.D. program is to draw and build upon the academic and research capabilities at the University of Alaska Fairbanks to offer an integrated course of advanced graduate study that addresses long-standing issues of concern to the state, the nation and the world. The program will consist of a common core curriculum that all students will complete, coupled with six thematic areas of emphasis from which students will choose a concentration:

  • Indigenous Research
  • Indigenous Knowledge Systems
  • Indigenous Languages
  • Indigenous Education
  • Indigenous Leadership
  • Indigenous Sustainability

Program Objectives

  1. To provide the programmatic infrastructure for advanced, in-depth, interdisciplinary graduate studies and research in academic fields related to the role of Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing in the contemporary world.

  2. To prepare graduates who are capable of conducting basic and applied research on social, political, educational, economic and cultural issues of concern to people and communities in the circumpolar north, with a particular emphasis on Alaska.

  3. To expand the pool of knowledgeable and highly skilled Alaskans who can assume leadership and technical positions with public and private sector organizations, including universities, school districts, social service agencies, Native corporations, tribal governments, and state and federal agencies in Alaska and beyond.

  4. To provide a venue to sponsor state, national and international seminars, conferences, exchanges and comparative research programs that bring people together around issues of concern to Alaska, the circumpolar north, and Indigenous people throughout the world.

  5. To contribute to and tap into newly emerging bodies of academic scholarship that address the role of Indigenous knowledge systems in fields such as ecological studies, natural resources management, health care, education, language revitalization, community development, social services, justice, and Native studies.

  6. To achieve economies-of-scale that put existing university resources and capabilities to more effective and efficient use in addressing issues of concern to all Alaskans.

The specific skill set of the graduates will include quantitative analysis, scientific applications, qualitative research methods, research design and program management, along with broad conceptual frameworks for understanding the dynamics of social-cultural-ecological systems.

Delivery Method

The program will be offered through a variety of flexible course delivery methods to students living throughout Alaska and beyond. The program offers a full complement of campus-based and distance education courses consistent with the standards of advanced graduate study at UAF.

Instructions

You will find instructions for the work you will do constituting the comprehensive exam for your PhD in Indigenous Studies. You will have three themes to address over a period of three months (approximately one month per theme) at the end of which you will be expected to submit three papers averaging 10 to 15 pages each plus a cover page for each theme (12 point type, 1.5 line spacing with appropriate APA citations). The themes listed below are intended to coincide with the focus of your PhD dissertation, so that if done properly, the papers you prepare for your comprehensive exam should also serve as chapters/sections in your dissertation. It is important therefore, that you have identified a focus for your dissertation research by the time you take on your comprehensive exam, and if possible, the exam papers should be completed the semester before you immerse your self in the writing of your dissertation. For credit purposes, you are encouraged to enroll in three or more credits of CCS 699, Thesis, the semester in which you take your comps, and then enroll in the final credits of CCS 699 the final semester when you complete your dissertation, though it is possible to complete all more than six credits of CCS 699 in one semester.

When you are finished with the three comp exam papers, please submit your responses to your committee chair and me as e-mail attachments—they will then be forwarded to and reviewed by your PhD committee members to determine if they are satisfactory or not. If any of the committee members have questions about any of the responses they will convey those to you, and an oral exam will be scheduled with your committee and an outside examiner to review your responses to the comp topics. Once the committee is satisfied with your responses, the appropriate paperwork will be submitted to the Graduate School signifying that you have completed your written and oral comprehensive exam for your PhD. This will be followed by submission of your Advancement to Candidacy as you come down the home stretch on your dissertation. Let me know if you have any questions along the way.

Following is a brief description of the three papers you are to prepare for your comprehensive exam. Your responses should roughly correspond to the introduction, literature review and research design associated with your PhD dissertation research.

Theme # 1: Overview of Proposed PhD Dissertation Research Topic

In the work you did for the course, CCS 608, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, it was pointed out that Indigenous peoples have traditionally formed a strong bond with the land and environment in which they live, and this bond has shaped much of their ways of knowing, world views and forms of consciousness that make up their Indigenous knowledge system and underlie their cultural traditions and practices. Based on the observations and issues raised in the courses you have taken for your PhD program, as well as your own experience, describe the topic you plan to address for your dissertation and discuss how it will contribute to the cultural practices, community wellbeing and/or quality of life of the people/community/organization to whom it is addressed. In other words, make the case for what you are planning to do and why, and provide illustrative examples to bolster your response.

Theme # 2: Literature Review on PhD Dissertation Topic

Given the research topic you have identified under Theme # 1, conduct a review/synopsis of existing literature related to the dominant idea, subject, principle or practice associated with your topic. Typically, the literature you cite should be from within the past ten years or so, and it should cover the major threads of prior work on the subject and locate your proposed contribution to the field (your contribution will be elaborated under Theme # 3). Provide appropriate citations (APA style) for the pertinent literature addressed in your review.

Theme # 3: Research Issues Related to PhD Dissertation Topic

Whereas the literature review under Theme # 2 highlights what is already known regarding your proposed dissertation topic, your response to Theme # 3 will describe the kind of information you will be assembling for your research building on the previous work, and the research/cultural documentation issues you anticipate as you proceed. How will you go about gathering the information you need to complete your dissertation, and what steps will you take to demonstrate respect for the cultural knowledge you will be drawing upon? Describe the kinds of information you will be seeking for your research, how you plan to go about it, and how you will attempt to make sense out of it in a culturally considerate way. You are encouraged to review the materials discussed in the CCS 604, Documenting Indigenous Knowledge course as you prepare your response to this theme. If your dissertation involves working with human subjects, this paper should be helpful in preparing your application to the Institutional Review Board as well. If appropriate, you may also describe some of the issues that have arisen among Indigenous peoples regarding cultural and intellectual property rights as they relate to research, including the steps that have been taken by Indigenous peoples’ to address these issues and to take into account Indigenous knowledge systems, ways of knowing and world views.

The joint Ph.D. program in Indigenous Studies draws and builds upon long-standing academic and research capabilities at UAF to offer an integrated course of advanced graduate study consisting of a common core curriculum that all students complete, coupled with six thematic areas of emphasis from which students choose a concentration:

Alaska wild berriesThe Indigenous Sustainability concentration is concerned with the social, cultural, and physical wellbeing of Indigenous communities at the present and into the future. Students focusing on this concentration area will explore interdisciplinary topics from a systems perspective that holistically examine the interactions between food, health, education, economic, and political subsystems, within a historical context. Knowledge sources for sustainability are not limited to a single cultural or ideological perspective, and new ideas and experiences concerning issues of sustainability are taken into consideration. The concept of sustainability is of growing concern to many academic disciplines; new course offerings are regularly being developed across the University of Alaska system, and students interested in this concentration area will have the opportunity to work closely with their graduate committee to find and select the courses most relevant to their individual studies.

Potential Courses

(subject to student and committee modification)

CCS/NRM/GEOG 656: Sustainable Livelihoods and Community Well-Being
In this course we will review the basic principles captured within the notion of sustainability, and will look at the cultural practices and individual behaviors that enhance or degrade sustainable livelihoods and community well-being. Emphasis is on understanding the historical context of ideas about sustainability, on 1 understanding the nature and magnitude of the social, economic and ecological dimensions of contemporary change, and the “best practices” currently in place for communities to respond effectively to change. Case studies will be used from around the world and the framework is comparative, cross-cultural and geographic; the primary focus of the course, however, is on understanding problems, impacts and design solutions specific to high latitudes.

ED F681: Place-Based Education
An examination of the relationship between local landscape and community and the development of human perception. Emphasis on the importance of the development of ecologically appropriate community-based educational programs in rural and urban schools. Priority placed on project-centered programs lending themselves to experimental learning opportunities. Includes literature review, discussion, curriculum exploration and design and on-site community exploration of active place-based educational programs.

(3+0)

ED F619: Cultural Atlases as a Pedagogical Strategy
The content of the course provides an in-depth look at how teachers can integrate technology and academics with oral traditions and offers a vehicle for helping communities define themselves and their unique cultural identity. Teachers will have an opportunity to guide their students through a positive collaboration with local culture-bearers, community members and educational personnel. The multimedia resources for this course provide numerous examples of cultural atlase and guidance on ways in which the rich oral traditions of Native people can be drawn upon in support of the school curriculum.

Prerequisites: ANTH F242; or permission of instructor. Stacked with CCS F418; ED F419. (3+0)

CCS F492: ETHNOECOLOGY
This course surveys the basic concepts of Ethnoecology, a field that began with the early work of Harold Conklin, Brent Berlin and others in the 1950s and 60s.  It has recently been the subject of new epistemological and methodological directions resulting from the rise of interdisciplinary linkages between and among the social, natural and the ecological sciences, and by new interests in Traditional or Indigenous Knowledge.  In brief, Ethnoecology for some is the scientific study of the way different groups of people in different locations understand the world around them, interact with the environment within which they live, and how these interactions and relationships are spatially structured and sustained over time. Through the course we will cover all basic areas of the globe, review methods and techniques for collecting and analyzing ethnoecological data, and draw examples from ethnobotany and ethnozoology, to name but two primary areas of interest. The new and emerging field of a different ethnoecology offers new insights into human-environment interactions, and of the sacred and secular relationship of people to place.

CCS/NRM/GEOG 454: COMPARATIVE FARMING AND SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS
In this course we review: the basic principles of food systems geography by comparing various food production strategies, including organic, “alternative,” and industrial farming, crop and livestock production at local, regional and global scales; food and nutritional security, including poverty, hunger and equity in a context of the industrial food system; and through ethnographic case studies we explore cross cultural perspectives on culinary and dietary traditions, food preference, individual and cultural identity.

ANTH/BIOL/ECON/NRM F647 Global to Local Sustainability
Explores the basic principles that govern resilience and change of ecological and social systems. Principles are applied across a range of scales from local communities to the globe. Working within and across each of these scales, students address the processes that influence ecological, cultural and economic sustainability, with an emphasis on northern examples.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTH/BIOL/ECON/NRM F649 Integrated Assessment and Adaptive Management
An interdisciplinary exploration of the theoretical and practical considerations of integrated assessment and adaptive management. Students survey concepts important in understanding societal and professional-level decision-making. Students work as individuals and as a team to undertake case studies with relevance to integrated assessment and adaptive management. Collectively, the class builds a portfolio of cases and conducts an integrated assessment. Note: In case of enrollment limit, priority will be given to graduate students in the Resilience and Adaptation Program in order for them to be able to meet their core requirements.

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing in a natural science, social science, or interdisciplinary program at UAF or another university; or permission of instructor.

MBA F642 Economics of Environmental and Business Sustainability
This course is designed to examine the emerging role of the business and corporate sector in responding to the economic challenges of achieving social and ecological sustainability. The microeconomic theory used to model business behavior motivated by profit maximization is expanded to an accounting framework, referred to as the triple bottom line (TBL). The TBL consists of profits, people and planet. The TBL motivates companies to measure financial, social and environmental outcomes associated with their business operations. The course investigates alternative measurements for evaluating the performance of the economy and the business and consumer sectors. Special fees apply.

Prerequisites: Must be admitted to the MBA program. (3+0)

PS F669 Arctic Politics and Governance
This course traces current developments in Arctic politics and governance from multiple perspectives; exploring, interests, processes, and behaviors of Arctic state- and non-state actors, individually and collectively. The course surveys the formal and informal institutions that govern resource development, pollution, shipping, state-indigenous relations, and security. Prerequisites: PS F450, PS F452 or PS F454 or equivalent; graduate standing; or permission of instructor. A background in comparative politics and/or international relations is also recommended.

(3+0)

Image showing how worldview relates to natural realm, spiritual realm and the human realm

Potential Courses

(subject to student and committee modification)

ANTH 630 Anthropological Field Methods (3 Credits)
Concentration on the practical concerns and aspects of conducting anthropological field research. Includes the relevant literature and significant discussions on the different aspects of fieldwork. In addition, students will gain practical experience in the problems, techniques and methods of fieldwork involving people from similar or distinct cultural backgrounds. The preparation of research proposals is also given attention.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in anthropology or permission of instructor.

ANTH 637 Methods in Ethno-historical Research (3 Credits)
Students of anthropology are introduced to the methods of historical research, particularly the critical evaluation of written documents, problems of archaic language and paleography, and methods for assessing art and folklorist tradition as sources of history. Oral history and the data of language and archaeology are considered.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in anthropology or permission of instructor.

ANTH/BIOL/ECON/NRM 648 Integrative Modeling of Natural and Social Systems
(3 Credits)
Provides a modeling approach to structuring knowledge from natural and social scientific disciplines so that relevant aspects of a complex societal problem are considered for the purpose of making management and policy decisions. Designed to help graduate students use models to integrate understanding about interactions among natural and social systems for the purpose of managing biological and human resources.

Prerequisite: STAT 200X or equivalent, graduate standing in a natural science, social science, humanities or interdisciplinary program at UAF or another university, or permission of instructor.

PSY 635 Field-Based Research Methods (3 Credits)
Methods used in doing cross-cultural research in community settings. Emphasis on formal descriptions of the interaction between people and their environments. The course will present a wide variety of designs, analyses and conceptual approaches appropriate to improving our general understanding of behavior in communities. Both quantitative and qualitative methods will be presented in the context of carrying out individual research projects.

Prerequisite: Admittance to the Community Psychology program or permission of instructor.

Totem - house postPotential Courses 

(subject to student and committee modification)

ANS 475  
Alaska Native Social Change(s) (3 Credits) 

Tradition and change in Native social institutions in contemporary society. Methods of identifying and analyzing significant Native social change processes for public understanding.

Prerequisite: ANTH 242 or permission of instructor.

ANTH 603  
Political Anthropology (3 Credits)  
Political systems and the law. Case studies from nonindustrial societies, developing nations and parapolitical systems or encapsulated societies, such as Native peoples in the U.S. Political structures and institutions; social conflict, dispute settlement, social control and the law, political competition over critical resources; and ethnicity.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANTH 607  
Kinship and Social Organization (3 Credits)  
Forms and function of family and household organization, kinship and marriage in diverse human sociocultural systems. Case studies from tribal and complex societies including contemporary United States.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ANTH 652  
Research Design and Professional Development Seminar (3 Credits) 
How to develop problem-based research in anthropology and prepare research proposals, grant proposals and publications along with critical evaluations of similar material. Topics include preparation of oral presentations for professional meetings, lectures and seminars; curriculum vitae preparation; and project budgeting.

Prerequisites: Upper-division anthropology course or permission of instructor.

ANTH 653  
Current Perspectives in Cultural Resource Management (3 Credits) 
Cultural resource management. Includes historic preservation and environmental law. Reviews pertinent legislation pertaining to the protection of historic properties and presents a series of real world problems confronted by archaeologists. Cultural resource management will be treated historically within a context of the development of American archaeology. Emphasis on practical aspects of career development.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ED 660  Educational Administration in Cultural Perspective (3 credits) 
Issues related to the social organization and socio-political context of schools, administrative and institutional change processes and the changing role of administrators in education, using a cross-cultural framework for analysis.

PSY/NORS 614  
Human Adaptation to the Circumpolar North (3 Credits)  
Patterns of individual and family adaptation to the stresses and opportunities of northern regions. Focuses on successful and unsuccessful responses to northern conditions--the arctic climate, the northern economy, cultural diversity, and the professional opportunities and stress factors of sparsely populated frontier settings. Students will complete an original research paper.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

RD 600  
Circumpolar Indigenous Leadership Symposium (3 Credits) 

Symposium serves three goals: to build an integrated and lifelong learning community among new and continuing students in the Rural Development program, to explore the qualities of indigenous leadership in dynamic cross-cultural settings, and to incorporate the insights and wisdom of experienced rural development practitioners.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor

RD 625  
Community Development Strategies: Principles and Practices (3 Credits) 

Strategies, principles and practice of community development in rural Alaska and throughout the circumpolar North. Topics explore how rural communities in diverse cultural, political and economic settings build on local assets, skills and capacities to improve the lives of indigenous and other Northern residents.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

RD 651  
Management Strategies for Rural Development (3 Credits)
Managing change and development among indigenous communities. Emphasis on rural development in the circumpolar North. Includes recent management strategies implemented in Alaska such as co-management of renewable resources, land management of Alaska Native corporations, cultural resource management, and the management of Alaska Native tribal governments, corporations and other organizations. Uses comparative case studies and effects of cultural and traditional values on management practices in different northern sociocultural environments.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

RD 652  
Indigenous Organization Management (3 Credits) 

Purposes, structure and methods of management of indigenous organizations with an emphasis on the North. Historical overview of Alaska Native organizations, including those established to pursue Native rights, land claims and government services. Case studies of corporations established under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be examined, as well as regional tribal organizations. Management of Alaska Native organizations is compared with formal organizations established by indigenous peoples throughout the circumpolar North. Western and indigenous organizational cultures and perceptions will be reviewed.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

PS/NORS 662  
Alaska Government and Politics (3 Credits)  
Alaska's government and politics, in the context of American state and local government, and politics and governments of circumpolar northern nations. Topics include political history, constitution, political parties, interest groups, elections, public opinion, governor, legislature, judiciary, administration and local governments. Compares Alaska to the contiguous 48 states and subnational governments of the circumpolar North; examines how government institutions and processes respond to social, environmental and political changes of Northern communities.

 

ANL mapPotential Courses 

(subject to student and committee modification)

Students enrolling in the Indigenous Languages thematic area are expected to acquire a degree of proficiency in an Indigenous language, as determined by the students graduate committee.

ANL/LING 651  
Topics in Athabascan Linguistics (3 Credits) 

Graduate-level introduction to important topics in Athabascan linguistics, including both foundational literature and current research. Topics may include laryngeal features; tonogenesis; the syntaxmorphology interface; argument structure; lexical semantics and discourse. Course may be repeated once for credit with permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: LING 601 or equivalent; graduate standing. Recommended: LING 603 and LING 604.

ED 620  Language, Literacy and Learning 
(3 Credits)  
The relationships among language, culture and thinking as issues of literacy and learning. Specific areas of emphasis include linguistic relativity, discourse, role of context in communications, variant language learning strategies and styles, speech community, open and closed linguistic systems, cognitive styles, and literacy as a cultural and cognitive phenomenon.

ED/LING  621  Cultural Aspects of Language Acquisition (3 Credits)  
An expanded view of the ways in which individuals become socialized into particular patterns of first and second language and literacy. The ongoing acquisition of both oral and written language(s) from early childhood through adult life. Topics will include: the cultural dimensions of language development; the relationship between communication and culture; bilingualism; and the role of language in the transmission of sociocultural knowledge.

ED 669  
Reading, Language and Culture (3 Credits) 

Introduction to the foundations of psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic theories as they relate to oral and written language acquisition and development. Focus on issues of language and literacy education practices in the Alaska context. Topics include bi-lingual and bi-literacy education, school and community languages and literacies, and culturally responsive pedagogy. Emphasis on teachers/students developing the skills and dispositions to become researchers of culture, language and literacy in their communities.

LING 602  
Second Language Acquisition (3 Credits)  
Central issues in second language acquisition research. Includes a critical review of SLA theories and research.

Prerequisites: LING 101 or LING 601; graduate standing; or permission of instructor.

LING 627  
Introduction to Linguistic Description and Documentation (3 Credits) 

General introduction to lexicography, field phonetics, grammatical documentation, investigation of narrative, other levels of linguistic documentation, the distinction between description and documentation and differences in structure and method between pedagogical and academic materials resulting from field work.

Prerequisites: LING 601 or equivalent, and demonstrated background in phonology and morphology, or permission of instructor.

LING 631/ANTH 632   
Field Methods in Descriptive Linguistics (3 Credits) 
Introduction to general issues in language field work and to issues specific to working with little studied and/or endangered languages in particular. Focus on introduction to writing systems, making records, computers and transcriptions, planning consultant sessions, working with consultants, interviewing, and ethics in the field. Projects include making transcriptions of familiar language, and later, working on unfamiliar language with a language consultant, selecting and carrying out a well-defined project, resulting in a term paper.

Prerequisites: LING 627, or permission of instructor.

LING 650  
Language Policy and Planning (3 Credits) 

Consideration of minority languages, including Alaska Native Languages, in light of their histories, current status and factors affecting future maintenance.

 

Image chart showing Native knowledge stream, System intergration, and Westen knowledge streamPotential Courses 

(subject to student and committee modification)

ANS/RD 401   Cultural Knowledge of Native Elders (3 Credits)  
Study with prominent Native tradition-bearers in Native philosophies, values and oral traditions. Traditional knowledge elicited through the cultural heritage documentation process. Analysis of existing interactions between cultural traditions and contemporary American life as experienced by Native elders.

Prerequisites: HIST 110, ANTH 242 and upper-division standing.

ANS/ED 461   Native Ways of Knowing (3 Credits)  
Focus on how culture and worldview shape who we are and influence the way we come to know the world around us. Emphasis on Alaska Native knowledge systems and ways of knowing.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANTH/NORS 670   Oral Sources; Issues in Documentation (3 Credits) 
Preparation for recording and use of oral resources. Examines how meaning is conveyed through oral traditions and personal narratives and the issues involved with recording and reproducing narratives. Includes management of oral recordings, ethical and legal considerations, issues of interpretation and censorship and the use of new technologies to access and deliver recordings.

Prerequisite: At least one undergraduate ANTH course and one undergraduate HIST course, or permission of instructor.

CCS/ED 611  Culture , Cognition and Knowledge Acquisiton (3 credits) 
An examination of the relationship between learning, thinking and perception in multicultural contexts.  Particular emphasis will be on the implications of these relationships for schooling.  Content will focus on cultural influences on perception, conceptual processes, learning, memory and problem solving.  Content will also reflect concern for practical teaching problems. 

Prerequisite: ED 610 recommended.

CCS 612  Traditional Ecological Knowledge (3 credits) 
Examines the acquisition and utilization of knowledge associated with long-term inhabitation of particular ecological systems and adaptations that arise from the accumulation of such knowledge. Attention will be given to the contemporary significance of traditional ecological knowledge as a complement to academic fields of study.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or approval of the instructor.

PSY 602  
Native Ways of Knowing (3 Credits) 

Covers the appropriate and valid ways of describing and explaining human behavior by using the social context, culture and history of indigenous groups. Includes indigenous approaches to values, health, the interconnection of family and community; the nature of spirituality and indigenous healing; and the importance of elders and spiritual healers. Course will be video-conferenced between UAA and UAF campuses. The course will make use of Blackboard and E-res to support distance delivery.

Prerequisite: Admittance into the psychology Ph.D. program or permission of instructor.

PSY 606  
Native Ways of Healing (3 Credits) 

Explores healing from a variety of Native perspectives, particularly from an Alaska Native perspective. Emphasizes the preparation and education of healers, their roles and work and integration within the community. Students will have the opportunity to examine the possible integration of clinical and community psychology with indigenous approaches to healing. Course will be video-conferenced between UAA and UAF campuses. The course will make use of Blackboard and E-res to support distance delivery.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor.

 

Image of a Sprial pathway chartPotential Courses 

(subject to student and committee modification)

ANS/ED 461  Native Ways of Knowing (3 Credits) 

Focus on how culture and worldview shape who we are and influence the way we come to know the world around us. Emphasis on Alaska Native knowledge systems and ways of knowing.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ED 606  Alaska Native Education (3 Credits)
School systems historically serving Native people, current efforts toward local control and the cross-cultural nature of this education.

Prerequisite: ANTH 242 or permission of instructor.

ED/CCS 610  Education and Cultural Processes (3 credits) 
Advanced study of the function of education as a cultural process and its relation to other aspects of a cultural system.  Students will be required to prepare a study in which they examine some aspect of education in a particular cultural context.

ED/CCS 611  Culture , Cognition and Knowledge Acquisiton (3 credits) 
An examination of the relationship between learning, thinking and perception in multicultural contexts.  Particular emphasis will be on the implications of these relationships for schooling.  Content will focus on cultural influences on perception, conceptual processes, learning, memory and problem solving.  Content will also reflect concern for practical teaching problems. 

Prerequisite: ED 610 recommended.

ED/CCS 613  Alaska Standards for Culturally Responsive Schools
 (3 Credits) 
Guidelines, rationale and resources for adapting educational policies, programs and practices to better address the cultural well-being of the students and communities they serve. Content will be grounded in the Alaska Standards for Culturally Responsive Schools, including standards for students, teachers, curriculum, schools and communities.

ED 631  Small Schools Curriculum Design (3 credits) 
Salient issues involved with the development of effective programs of instruction in small schools, including foundational design, conceptual models, organizational strategies, technical skills, current issues and trends, and their implications and application to the environment of rural Alaska.

ED/NORS 680   Comparative Education
(3 Credits) 

Analysis of international systems of public education. Issues addressed include social context, ethnicity, gender, ideology, international power, level of development, current issues and problems, and efforts toward reform.

ED 681   Place Based Education (3 Credits) 

An examination of the relationship between local landscape and community, and the development of human perception. Emphasis on the importance of the development of ecologically appropriate community-based educational programs in rural and urban schools. Priority placed on project-centered programs lending themselves to experimental learning opportunities. Includes literature review, discussion, curriculum exploration and design, and on-site community exploration of active place-based educational programs.

Ph.D. candidates will participate in research activities across a variety of academic disciplines and applied fields at UAF. They are encouraged to engage in comparative studies with other indigenous peoples around the world and to focus their dissertation research on issues of relevance to Alaska and the Arctic. Using the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. model of academic assignment, student’s home base will be in the School or College of their major advisor, who also serves as an affiliate faculty for the program.

In collaboration with the graduate committee, each student develops a program of coursework and research that produces a unique intellectual contribution to the applied fields associated with Indigenous Studies. Students elect to focus on one of the five thematic areas or they may choose in collaboration with their graduate committee to draw on multiple themes to develop their areas of knowledge and dissertation research.